We are a group of women with diverse experiences and talents. Our members and the community engage in county, regional, and state policy concerns and provide a forum for Democratic leaders and organizers. The time and resources dedicated by our members lead us to contribute in the best possible ways to our community.

We are continuing our strong efforts to bring informative leaders and advocates to our monthly meetings and fundraising for woman candidates in our area. This year, with new leadership at the helm, long-time and dedicated members are making fresh efforts to expand our work through the web, community relations, social events, and fundraising.

Objectives

Bold leadership requires unwavering organization, mobilization, and a striving to win help us reach the goals you’ll find on this page.

 

Support and Promote the Principles of the Democratic Party

The current agenda of the National Democratic Party is below as stated on the website Democrats.org (link):

There are several core beliefs that tie our party together: Democrats believe that we’re greater together than we are on our own — that this country succeeds when everyone gets a fair shot, everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same rules. Our party is focused on building an economy that lifts up all Americans, not just those at the top.

That’s why Democrats are working to make progress on issues like job creation, equal pay, education, health care, and clean energy.

 

Encourage Women to Seek Office and Participate in the Party

In 2013 The North Carolina Council for Women, a women’s advocacy agency within the North Carolina Department of Administration, published a significant report. Read below, and find the link to the report here Status of Women in North Carolina :

By running for office, voting, and serving as leaders in the community, women can make sure that their priorities are reflected in public policy decisions and debates.

They can help shape laws, policies, and decision-making in ways that reflect their interests and needs, as well as those of their families and communities.

• In (NC), women voted at higher rates than men in both the 2008 and 2010
elections. In the 2008 presidential elections, approximately 2,364,000 women (69 percent of eligible female voters) and 2,006,000 men (66 percent of eligible male voters) went to the polls.

• In the (NC) state legislature, women hold 5 of 50 seats in the Senate (10 percent)
and 35 of 120 seats in the House of Representatives (29 percent), resulting in a
combined 23.5 percent of all elected General Assembly seats. This situates North Carolinain 28th place among the 50 states and District of Columbia…

 

Partner With The State Democratic Organizations

Click the links of some of the state and regional affiliates whose executive committees we work with:

Democratic Women of North Carolina

North Carolina Democratic Party

 

Support Democratic Women’s Organizations at the District and County Levels

Our participation in the network of local women’s democratic groups to get women elected and back women’s legislative issues is critical.

Jennifer L. Lawless, of the Women & Politics Institute at American University, wrote a study revealing:

Women are much less likely than men to think they are qualified to run for office.
Women are less likely than men to receive the suggestion to run for office — from anyone.
Women are still responsible for the majority of childcare and household tasks. In families where both adults are working (generally in high-level careers), women are roughly six times more likely than men to bear responsibility for the majority of household tasks, and they are about ten times more likely to be the primary childcare provider. This division of labor is consistent across political party lines.”